Please take a look to see if your question about hoodoo is here and click on any of the questions to go to different explanatory pages and posts. If you’d like to ask something else, feel free to send me a message.


 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: “What’s the difference between hoodoo and rootwork?”
A: They are two different names for the same African American tradition.

Q: “Given these circumstances / my background / my race / my situation, am I allowed to practice hoodoo/rootwork?”
A: Check out the flowchart that I made that should help you figure out whether or not it’s appropriate for you to practice hoodoo.

Q:I want to get started with hoodoo, how can I do that?” / “Do you have resources on hoodoo/rootwork?”
A: The Spirit Roots Hoodoo Library is an extensive collection of articles and posts on everything from beginner’s resources and hoodoo basics to instructions on lots of hoodoo techniques to recipes and guides for all different types of workings.

Q: “I want to avoid appropriating hoodoo, how can I make sure that I’m doing that?”
A: I’ve created a basic guide giving some specific pointers for things to watch out for to avoid culturally appropriating hoodoo as well as how to respectfully appreciate it.

Q: “Isn’t hoodoo/rootwork an American folk tradition that isn’t exclusive to African American culture and open to white people as well?”
A: No. There are other Southern folk magic traditions that are open to everybody, but hoodoo/rootwork specifically was developed from African traditional religions by slaves of African descent in the US and remains a part of African American culture.

Q: “Do you have to be Christian to practice hoodoo/rootwork?”
A: No, you don’t have to be Christian to be a rootworker, but there is a long history that intertwines the religion and the folk tradition together.

Q: “Can I practice Kemeticism [or Wicca or any other magic tradition] and hoodoo together?”
A: Maybe, but it’s a good idea in my personal opinion to carefully study both traditions separately first to understand their distinct differences and potential (or lack thereof) for compatibility.

 

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